Definition of Key concepts

INTENSITY:

Intensity CPAG Icon

Moderate: Physical activity that is performed at 4.0 − 6.9 times the intensity of rest in children & youth (or 4.0 – 6.9 on a scale of 1 to 10). On a scale relative to an individual’s personal capacity, moderate-intensity physical activity is usually a 5 or 6 on a scale of 10. If you’re doing moderate-intensity activity, you can talk but not sing during the activity. A sign of moderate-intensity activity is when you’re working hard enough to raise your heart rate. Some examples of moderate-intensity activities include: hiking, rollerblading, skateboarding, riding a bicycle and playing catch.

Vigorous: Physical activity that is performed at 7.0 or more times the intensity of rest in children & youth. On a scale relative to an individual’s personal capacity, vigorous-intensity physical activity is usually a 7 or 8 on a scale of 10. If you’re doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. A sign of vigorous-intensity activity is when your heart rate has gone up quite a bit. Some examples of vigorous-intensity activities include: tag, jumping rope, running, basketball, martial arts, tennis, swimming and vigorous types of dancing.

STRENGTHENING ACTIVITIES:

CPAG Strength Icon

Bone-strengthening physical activities are primarily designed to increase the strength of specific sites in bones that make up the skeletal system. Bone-strengthening activities produce an impact or tension force on the bones that promotes bone growth and strength. Some examples of bone-strengthening activities include: hopping, skipping, jumping rope, running, gymnastics, lifting weights, volleyball, tennis and basketball.

Muscle-strengthening physical activities increase skeletal muscle strength, power, endurance and mass. Muscle-strengthening activities are activities that use the principles of strength training, resistance training, or muscular strength and endurance exercises. Some examples of muscle-strengthening activities include: tug-of-war, push-ups, sit-ups, tree climbing, swinging on playground equipment, rock climbing and using weight machines.

For more information about these concepts, please visit the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Glossary of Terms.